Signup Join Engineers Group
Home » 

Radiography Testing- X And Gamma Technique

Radiography Testing- X And Gamma  Technique

Radiography Testing- X And Gamma  Technique is suitable for the detection of internal defects in ferrous and non-ferrous metals and other materials. X-rays, generated electrically, and Gamma rays emitted from radio-active isotopes, are penetrating radiation which is differentially absorbed by the material through which it passes; the greater the thickness, the greater the absorbtion. Furthermore, the denser the material the greater the absorbtion.


X and Gamma rays also have the property, like light, of partially converting silver halide crystals in a photographic film to metallic silver, in proportion to the intensity of the radiation reaching the film, and therefore forming a latent image. This can be developed and fixed in a similar way to normal photographic film. Material with internal voids is tested by placing the subject between the source of radiation and the film. The voids show as darkened areas, where more radiation has reached the film, on a clear background. The principles are the same for both X and Gamma radiography.


In X-radiography the penetrating power is determined by the number of volts applied to the X-Ray tube - in steel approximately 1000 volts per inch thickness is necessary. In Gamma radiography the isotope governs the penetrating power and is unalterable in each isotope. Thus Iridium 192 is used for 1/2" to 1" steel and Caesium 134 is used for 3/4" to 21/2" steel.


In X-radiography the intensity, and therefore the exposure time, is governed by the amperage of the cathode in the tube. Exposure time is usually expressed in terms of milliampere minutes. With Gamma rays the intensity of the radiation is set at the time of supply of the isotope. 

The source of radiation is positioned on the other side of the subject some distance away, so that the radiation passes through the subject and on to the film. After the exposure period the film is removed, processed, dried, and then viewed by transmitted light on a special viewer.


Recent developments in radiography permit "real time" diagnosis. Such techniques as computerised tomography yield much important information, though these methods maybe suitable for only investigative purposes and not generally employed in production quality control.

Click To Comment
Related Articles
E-College Join Engineers Group E-College
Our TrainedEngineers Blog